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Frequency Databases for the DNA Probes MS1, MS31, MS43A, and YNH24, Derived from Caucasians, and Afro-Caribbeans in the London Area

  • C. Buffery
  • F. Burridge
  • M. Greenhalgh
  • S. Jones
  • G. Willott
Part of the Advances in Forensic Haemogenetics book series (HAEMOGENETICS, volume 4)

Abstract

DNA from blood samples submitted to Metropolitan Police Forensic Science Laboratory have been analysed with the probes MS1, MS31, MS43A and YNH24 using the restriction enzyme Hinf I. Frequency databases have been prepared from more than 1000 Caucasian and more than 500 Afro Caribbeans in order to assess the evidential significance of matching DNA profiles.

Keywords

VNTR Locus Spontaneous Mutation Rate Frequency Database Hypervariable Locus Observe Mutation Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Buffery
    • 1
  • F. Burridge
    • 1
  • M. Greenhalgh
    • 1
  • S. Jones
    • 1
  • G. Willott
    • 1
  1. 1.Metropolitan Police Forensic Science LaboratoryLondonUK

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