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Occurrence and Behaviour of Mercury and Methylmercury in the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environment

  • S. Padberg
  • K. May

Abstract

The distribution of mercury and methylmercury in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and in the human food chain was studied. Using a modified cold vapour AAS for the determination of mercury very low concentrations could be analyzed in different environmental and biological matrices. Methylmercury was separated by ion exchanger after hydrochloride extraction or by water vapour distillation with H2SO4/NaCl. It was possible to investigate the transport and the transformation mechanisms in the aquatic and the terrestrial environment. Thus, information about the complex interactions between the different compartments regarding the distribution of mercury in the environment and its possible impact on humans by the uptake of food was obtained.

Keywords

Mercury Concentration MeHg Concentration Terrestrial System Environmental Specimen Bank Total Mercury Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Padberg
  • K. May

There are no affiliations available

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