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Intraphagolysosomal pH and Intracellular Particle Dissolution in Canine and Rat Alveolar Macrophages

  • W. G. Kreyling
  • W. Beisker
  • U. Miaskowski
  • M. Neuner
  • P. Heilmann
Conference paper

Abstract

Intracellular dissolution of a large variety of inhaled inorganic environmental particles — which are not readily soluble in the epithelial lining fluid of the lungs — is the first step of an important long-term clearance mechanism of the lungs by which the dissolved material is eliminated to blood (Kreyling, 1992). Intracellular particle dissolution (IPD) occurs in phagolysosomal vacuoles of phagocytes (Kreyling et al., 1990). IPD was shown to be more effective for a number of materials than dissolution in extracellular body fluids as recently reviewed (Kreyling, 1992). Since the intraphagolysosomal pH (PLpH) at about 5 is lower than that of the surrounding cell plasma at about 7.2 (Nyberg et al., 1989a, 1989b), PLpH is believed to be an important co-factor of IPD and thereby of an important long-term clearance mechanism of the lungs.

Keywords

Alveolar Macrophage Test Particle Epithelial Line Fluid Full Medium Interspecies Comparison 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. G. Kreyling
    • 1
  • W. Beisker
    • 2
  • U. Miaskowski
    • 1
  • M. Neuner
    • 1
  • P. Heilmann
    • 1
  1. 1.GSF — Forschungszentrum für Umwelt und GesundheitProjekt InhalationNeuherbergFR Germany
  2. 2.GSF — Forschungszentrum für Umwelt und GesundheitInstitut für Biophysikalische StrahlenforschungNeuherbergFR Germany

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