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Fast Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Three Dimensional Volumetric Calculations in Degenerative Central Nervous System Diseases

  • G. Birbamer
  • S. Felber
  • A. Kampfl
  • F. Aichner
  • F. Gerstenbrand
  • H. Benesch
Conference paper

Abstract

Diagnosis of degenerative central nervous system (CNS) disorders with and without dementia is primarily based on neurological and neuropsychological examination (Gerstenbrand et al. 1990; Marsden 1985). In order to differentiate between treatable and nontreatable pathologies that cause dementia, neuroradiological examination has proven to be helpful (Le May 1986). In particular, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), based on high tissue contrast and multiplanarity, has become a valuable tool in the detection and delineation of intracerebral pathologies (Aichner et al. 1988; Perovitch et al. 1990).

Keywords

Senile Dementia Gradient Echo Sequence Total Brain Volume Gradient Echo Spinocerebellar Degeneration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Birbamer
    • 1
  • S. Felber
  • A. Kampfl
  • F. Aichner
  • F. Gerstenbrand
  • H. Benesch
  1. 1.Gemeinsame Institutseinrichtung für Magnetresonanztomographie und SpektroskopieUniversität InnsbruckInnsbruckAustria

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