Assessment of Mild, Moderate, and Severe Head Injury

  • M. D. Lezak
Conference paper

Abstract

Despite the many different variables that can enter into the occurrence of brain damage in a moving vehicle accident (MVA), a similar pattern of deficits tends to emerge, differing among patients mostly with respect to the severity of the injury (Adams et al. 1985; Eisenberg and Levin 1989; Pang 1989; Teasdale and Mendelow 1984). This pattern of deficits should determine the core neuropsychological assessment program for persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Keywords

Fatigue Depression Tate Stim Rote 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. D. Lezak

There are no affiliations available

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