Gene Expression During Seed Formation and Maturation in Crucifereae

  • M. Raynal
  • L. Aspart
  • P. Gaubier
  • D. Depigny
  • F. Grellet
  • M. Delseny
Conference paper

Abstract

Mature seeds contain a significant stock of stored mRNA, the life-span of which is as long as the seed-life (Payne, 1976; Delseny et al., 1977). A basic question in seed biology is the role and function of this stored mRNA. During the last ten years, many plant molecular biologists have addressed this question. As a result, seed development has been extensively studied. Most results concern the easiest genes to deal with, those coding for the storage proteins. However this gives only a partial view of seed development (Dure, 1985; Casey et al., 1986). Trying to answer questions concerning mRNA stored in mature seeds we have been led to analyse gene expression at various developmental stages and to realise that during seed development a number of genes are differentially expressed and sequentially switched on and off.

Keywords

Maize Agarose Carboxyl Electrophoresis Germinate 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Raynal
    • 1
  • L. Aspart
    • 1
  • P. Gaubier
    • 1
  • D. Depigny
    • 1
  • F. Grellet
    • 1
  • M. Delseny
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Physiologie et Biologie Moléculaire Végétales (URA 565 du CNRS)Université de PerpignanPerpignan-CédexFrance

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