The Secretion of Colicin V

  • Michael J. Fath
  • Rachel Skvirsky
  • Lynne Gilson
  • Hare Krishna Mahanty
  • Roberto Kolter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 65)

Abstract

Colicin V was the first colicin to be described in the literature. In 1925, Gratia described a factor which he called factor V which was biologically active against “coli” (Gratia, 1925). This factor was studied further and given the name “colicin V” (Fredericq et a.., 1949), but complete characterization was hindered by the apparent instability of the protein. As more was learned about the properties of other colicins such as A, El, and I, it became evident that colicin V (ColV) did not share most of the properties which had come to be associated with colicins. ColV is not SOS inducible, it is much smaller (6 kd) than other colicins, and it does not utilize a lysis protein for its release (Gilson et a.., 1990). Instead, it requires a set of dedicated export proteins. By these criteria, ColV more appropriately belongs to the related family of antimicrobial agents called microcins. For these reasons, we classify ColV as a microcin. But, for historical reasons, we feel it appropriate that its name remain unchanged.

Keywords

Codon Glycine Polysaccharide Serine Polypeptide 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. Fath
    • 1
  • Rachel Skvirsky
    • 1
  • Lynne Gilson
    • 1
  • Hare Krishna Mahanty
    • 1
  • Roberto Kolter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and Molecular GeneticsHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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