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The Contribution of Long-Term Records of Hydrologic Extremes to Risk Analyses

  • Yehouda Enzel
  • Lisa L. Ely
  • P. Kyle House
  • Victor R. Baker
  • Lucien Duckstein
  • Jean Weber
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 29)

Abstract

We discuss the advantages of lengthening the records of extreme floods and droughts by geological and botanical data and propose a methodology to incorporate such data into risk analyses. By themselves, such data provide information on the most extreme events that actually occurred in a drainage basin or region during the last several centuries to millennia. Through the adaptation of existing methodologies, these records serve as prior information within the Bayesian framework and substantially improve the estimated parameters of the probability distribution functions of extreme phenomena.

Keywords

Tree Ring Large Flood Hydrologic Extreme Partial Duration Series Runoff Time Series 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yehouda Enzel
    • 1
  • Lisa L. Ely
    • 1
  • P. Kyle House
    • 1
  • Victor R. Baker
    • 1
  • Lucien Duckstein
    • 2
  • Jean Weber
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of GeosciencesUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  2. 2.Department of System and Industrial EngineeringUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  3. 3.Department of StatisticsUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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