Synergetics of Evoked Alpha and Theta Rhythms in the Brain: Topographic and Modality-Dependent Aspects

  • E. Ba§ar
  • C. Ba§ar-Eroglu
  • E. Rahn
  • M. Schürmann
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Series in Synergetics book series (SSSYN, volume 55)

Abstract

Evoked electrical activity of the brain and brain resonance phenomena are discussed in the context of synergetics /l,2/ as an extension to a previous article /3/. The analysis methods given in the previous work /3/ are applied for analysis of topographic and modality-dependent properties of evoked potentials. Experimental data were obtained (1) from auditory and visual cortex in 5 cats and (2) from vertex and occipital derivations in 12 human subjects. The evoked potentials were studied in the frequency domain by means of Fourier transforms. Furthermore, digital filtering was applied to confirm and extend the analysis. Preliminary results indicated that resonances were observed mainly in 5, 10, 20 and 40 Hz frequency bands. The frequency of resonance maxima depended on the sites of measurement electrodes and the stimulus modality. We conclude that the analysis of resonance phenomena in the brain is a useful approach to understand the relation between evoked potentials and single-cell recordings.

Keywords

Entropy Coherence Sine Rosen Amplit 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Ba§ar
    • 1
  • C. Ba§ar-Eroglu
    • 1
  • E. Rahn
    • 1
  • M. Schürmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für PhysiologieMedizinische Universität zu LübeckLübeck 1Germany

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