Leads for Future Studies from a Case-Control Study of Occupational Exposures and Multiple Myeloma in Denmark

  • E. F. Heineman
  • J. Olsen
  • L. M. Pottern
  • M. R. Gomez
  • E. Raffn
  • A. Blair
Conference paper

Abstract

Although multiple myeloma is not considered an occupational cancer, it has been linked with a number of occupations and occupational exposures (Riedel 1990). The existence in Denmark of a national cancer registry and the availability of employment records on a national level presented a unique opportunity to explore further the role of occupation in multiple myeloma. A collaborative population-based case-control study of multiple myeloma was conducted by the National Cancer Institute and the Danish Cancer Registry to refine and develop hypotheses regarding occupational exposures in the origin of multiple myeloma. The incidence of multiple myeloma among men in Denmark (2.7 per 100,000 in 1977–82) is similar to that in Finland, the United Kingdom, and among U.S. white men, suggesting that clues generated from this investigation may be relevant to many countries. A manuscript currently in preparation will describe results for the males in detail. This paper presents two preliminary findings, however, in the hope that they may be of value to other investigators.

Keywords

Rubber Gasoline Anhydride Myeloma Phthalate 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. F. Heineman
    • 1
  • J. Olsen
    • 2
  • L. M. Pottern
    • 1
  • M. R. Gomez
    • 1
  • E. Raffn
    • 2
  • A. Blair
    • 1
  1. 1.Occupational Studies Section, Environmental Epidemiology BranchNational Cancer InstituteRockvilleUSA
  2. 2.Danish Cancer RegistryCopenhagenDenmark

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