Epidemiologic Studies of Multiple Myeloma: Occupation and Radiation Effects

  • D. A. Riedel

Abstract

The focus of this summary is a review of the more recent multiple myeloma epidemiologic studies that address occupation and radiation exposures. Most of the investigations have been conducted in white populations, with few focusing on blacks alone, or factors that might explain the black/white differences in risk of this cancer.

Keywords

Dust Lymphoma Benzene Petroleum Leukemia 

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Reference

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Suggested Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. A. Riedel
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer InstituteNIHBethesdaUSA

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