Surgical Strategy in Patients with Associated Carotid and Coronary Artery Lesions: Staged or Combined Operations?

  • G. Marinelli
  • B. Turinetto
  • M. Cazzato
  • A. Pierangeli
Conference paper

Abstract

It is well known that life expectancy in industrialized countries has increased tremendously. Whereas at the beginning of the nineteenth century in Italy overall life expectancy was almost 43 years, in 1990 it is 73 and 79 years for men and women, respectively. More surprisingly, the further life expectancy for 75 year olds is still very high, namely 9 and 12 further years for men and women respectively. Therefore, elderly patients are becoming more and more numerous, and medical and surgical approaches have totally changed.

Keywords

Ischemia Peri Arteriosclerosis 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Marinelli
    • 1
  • B. Turinetto
    • 1
  • M. Cazzato
    • 1
  • A. Pierangeli
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cardiovascular SurgeryUniversity of BolognaBolognaItaly

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