Antidepressive Action of Rubidium

  • D. De Maio
  • G. Buffa
  • D. Dorigo
  • M. Laviani
Conference paper

Abstract

The discovery of rubidium goes back to 1861 when Bunsen and Kirkhoff isolated it from rocks containing lepidolite. Therefore, its use in therapy only began in 1880, with its employment against epilepsy, syphilis, and cardiac insufficiency. Most patients treated with rubidium showed a reduction in heart rate, an increase in blood pressure and, above all, a psychic sense of well-being.

Keywords

Toxicity Depression Lithium Adenosine Selenium 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Abou-Saleh MT, Coppen A (1989) The efficacy of low-dose lithium: clinical, physiological and biological correlates. J Psychiatr Res 23/2: 157–162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Belmaker RA, Hamburger-Barr R et al. (1984) The effect of rubidium and lithium on adenylate cyclase and neurotransmitter receptors. In: Corsini GU (ed) Current trends in lithium and rubidium therapy. MTP Press, Lancaster, pp 59–75.Google Scholar
  3. Casacchia M, Rossi A, Marola V et al. (1984) The use of rubidium chloride in depressive disorder: clinical aspects. In: Corsini GU (ed) Current trends in lithium and rubidium therapy. MTP Press, Lancaster, pp 255–259.Google Scholar
  4. Corsini GU, Reda M, Burrai C et al. (1984) Preliminary results with rubidium in depressed patients. In: Corsini GU (ed) Current trends in lithium and rubidium therapy. MTP Press, Lancaster, pp 247–253.Google Scholar
  5. De Maio D et al. (1989) Metabolismo del litio e liposomi di fosfolipidi ipotalamici. In: Atti del 37 congresso nazionale della Societa Italiana di Psichiatria, 6-11 Feb 1989, Rome. CIC Internazionali, Rome, Suppl II, pp 243-251.Google Scholar
  6. Fieve RR, Meltzer HL (1974) Rubidium salts: toxic effects in human and clinical effects as an antidepressant drug. Psychopharmacol Bull 1: 38–50..Google Scholar
  7. Fieve RR, Jamison KR, Goodnick PJ (1985) The use of lithium and experimental rubidium in psychiatry. In: Gabay S et al. (eds) Metal ions in neurology and psychiatry. Liss, New York, pp 107–120.Google Scholar
  8. Geisler A, Klysner R, Andersen PH (1984) Opposite effects of lithium and rubidium on neuro-hormone-stimulating cyclic-AMP accumulation in rat brain homogenates. In: Corsini GU(ed) Current trends in lithium and rubidium therapy. MTP Press, Lancaster, pp 37–55.Google Scholar
  9. Meltzer HL, Taylor RM, Platman SR, Fieve RR (1969) Rubidium; a potential modifier of affect and behavior. Nature 233: 321–322.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Sarteschi P, Placidi GF, Lanzi A et al. (1984) Rubidium salts in depressed patients. An open pilot study standardized techniques. In: Corsini GU (ed) Current trends in lithium and rubidium therapy. MTP Press, Lancaster, pp 225–246.Google Scholar
  11. Simon P (1978) Que peut apporter la pharmacologie experimentale à l’étude des antidépresseurs ? In: Pichot P (ed) Les voies normelles de la depression. Masson, Paris, pp 162–168.Google Scholar
  12. Stolk JM, Nowack WJ, Baargas JD (1970) Brain norepinephrine: enhanced turnover after rubidium treatment. Science 168: 501–503.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. De Maio
  • G. Buffa
  • D. Dorigo
  • M. Laviani

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations