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Amiloride and Severe Lithium-Induced Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

  • M. Tuoni
  • M. Taddei
  • C. Pasquini
  • M. Bertoli
  • M. Meschi
  • A. Bionda
  • S. Battini
  • G. F. Placidi
Conference paper

Abstract

Lithium (Li) has been and continues to be a linking force in biomedical science generally, creating an area of interest for specialists in different scientific disciplines, even if the field of most common application is psychiatry. In current psychiatric practice Li represents the therapy of choice in treatment-resistant depression. The special physical characteristics of the Li ion, combined with its chemical relationship with sodium, mean that it penetrates into a wide variety of physiological systems. There is competition with sodium transport in the distal tubule and inhibition of renal sodium appears to be antidiuretic hormone (ADH)-mediated, although it has not been demonstrated in man.

Keywords

Urine Osmolality Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus Permanent Renal Damage Plasma Urine Renal Lithium Clearance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Tuoni
  • M. Taddei
  • C. Pasquini
  • M. Bertoli
  • M. Meschi
  • A. Bionda
  • S. Battini
  • G. F. Placidi

There are no affiliations available

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