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Eye and Ear pp 16-20 | Cite as

Calcification of the Cornea, Mouse and Rat

  • William W. Carlton
  • James A. Render
Part of the Monographs on Pathology of Laboratory Animals book series (LABORATORY)

Abstract

Corneal calcification results in opacification, with the size of the opacity depending upon the extent of the calcification. It may appear as small, pale spots or as an opacity of geometric shape (Taradach and Greaves 1984), or it may be diffuse. Slight calcification produces a slight turbidity, more substantial focal deposits appear as gray dots beneath the corneal epithelium, and larger deposits cause the cornea to be chalky white.

Synonyms

Band keratopathy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • William W. Carlton
  • James A. Render

There are no affiliations available

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