Skin Substitutes

  • Ge Sheng-de

Abstract

It is well known that burns may be associated with many local and systemic problems due to the loss of the skin barrier and function. Local burn management to promote wound healing of course is of great importance, because it not only treats local wounds but also resolves systemic problems. In extensive deep burns, wound coverage is achieved by skin grafting. When there is an inadequate amount of intact skin, i.e., shortage of skin donor sites, alternative material is applied. Skin substitutes have been developed for the conversion of an open wound to a closed wound.

Keywords

Hepatitis Chitosan Nylon Cyclosporin Polyurethane 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ge Sheng-de

There are no affiliations available

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