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Bone Marrow Blast Count at Day 28 as the Single Most Important Prognostic Factor in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  • G. E. Janka-Schaub
  • H. Stuehrk
  • B. Kortuem
  • U. Graubner
  • R. J. Haas
  • U. Goebel
  • H. Juergens
  • H. J. Spaar
  • K. Winkler
  • COALL Study Group
Conference paper
Part of the Haematology and Blood Transfusion / Hämatologie und Bluttransfusion book series (HAEMATOLOGY, volume 34)

Abstract

Intensification of therapy and risk-adapted treatment have increased the cure rates for childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) to 60%–70% [1–5]. Among the prognostic parameters the initial white blood count (WBC) has been considered to be the most important factor in several studies [4, 6, 7]. Other predictors for relapse include age, sex, immunological subtype, and structural chromosomal changes [4, 7–9]. Also in earlier reports it was suggested that the rapidity of lymphoblast cytoreduction during the first 1–2 weeks of treatment correlates with the probability of disease-free survival (DFS) [4, 10, 11]. In the present study the prognostic value of the percentage of lymphoblasts in the bone marrow at day 28 was evaluated.

Keywords

Complete Remission Bone Marrow Aspirate High Relapse Rate Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Blast Count 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. E. Janka-Schaub
    • 1
  • H. Stuehrk
    • 1
  • B. Kortuem
    • 1
  • U. Graubner
    • 2
  • R. J. Haas
    • 2
  • U. Goebel
    • 3
  • H. Juergens
    • 3
  • H. J. Spaar
    • 4
  • K. Winkler
    • 1
  • COALL Study Group
  1. 1.Children’s Hospital, Department of Hematology and OncologyUniversity of HamburgHamburg 20Germany
  2. 2.Children’s Hospital, Department of Hematology and OncologyUniversity of MunichMünchen 2Germany
  3. 3.Children’s Hospital, Department of Hematology and OncologyUniversity of DüsseldorfDüsseldorfGermany
  4. 4.Hess KinderklinikBremen 1Deutschland

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