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Critical Issues for Decision Makers in Providing Operator and Maintainer Training for Advanced Air Traffic Control Systems

  • Richard B. Chobot
  • Mary C. Chobot
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 73)

Abstract

The introduction of advanced air traffic control systems presents a number of challenges to senior decision makers. The objective of this paper is to present an overview of six critical issues that decision makers must consider relative to training. These issues are:
  • Method of acquisition

  • Use of specifications and standards

  • Need for integrated work team of system engineers and training professionals

  • Training delivery

  • Courseware validation and measurement of proficiency

  • Configuration management

Keywords

Life Cycle Cost Total Quality Management Training Material Configuration Management Training Acquisition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard B. Chobot
    • 1
  • Mary C. Chobot
    • 1
  1. 1.Mary C. Chobot and AssociatesAnnandaleUSA

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