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Involvement of γδ T Cells in Respiratory Virus Infections

  • P. C. Doherty
  • W. Allan
  • M. Eichelberger
  • S. Hou
  • K. Bottomly
  • S. Carding
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 173)

Abstract

Some aspects of the immunobiology of virus-induced respiratory disease are relatively well understood. It is known, for instance, that the adoptive transfer of cloned CD8+ T cells to immunologically naive mice infected intranasally (i.n.) with an influenza A virus greatly enhances virus clearance (Lukacher et al 1984, Taylor & Askonas 1986). The same has been observed for cloned CD4+ T cells, though the kinetics of virus elimination are more protracted (Lukacher et al 1986). In both cases, the effect is mediated by T cells that are conventionally MHOrestricted and are very specific for the infecting pathogen. There is thus no doubt that effector functions mediated by αβ T cell receptor (TCR)-bearing lymphocytes are of central importance in recovery from infection of the respiratory tract with influenza A viruses. Recent studies of the influenza pneumonia model have established that there is substantial involvement of lymphocytes with mRNA for the γδ TCR late in the course of the inflammatory process, after infectious virus has been eliminated (Allan et al 1990, Carding et al 1990 a). The obvious question is whether these γδ T cells contribute to the specific host response, or are simply recruited passively by the αβ TCR+ effectors (Doherty et al 1990).

Keywords

H1N1 Virus Allantoic Fluid Sendai Virus Howard Hughes Medical Institute Heat Shock Protein mRNA 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. C. Doherty
    • 1
  • W. Allan
    • 1
  • M. Eichelberger
    • 1
  • S. Hou
    • 1
  • K. Bottomly
    • 2
  • S. Carding
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of ImmunologySt. Jude Children’s Research HospitalMemphisUSA
  2. 2.Section of Immunobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Yale University School of Medicine and Department of BiologyYale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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