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Analysis of Primary T Cell Responses to Intact and Fractionated Microbial Pathogens

  • K. Pfeffer
  • B. Schoel
  • H. Gulle
  • Heidrun Moll
  • Sandra Kromer
  • S. H. E. Kaufmann
  • H. Wagner
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 173)

Summary

Freshly isolated human T lymphocytes were tested for their response to mycobacteria, mycobacterial lysates, 2 dimensional (2D) PAGE separated mycobacterial lysates, leishmania and defined leishmanial antigen preparations. While γδ T cells proliferated vigourusly in the presence of mycobacteria and mycobacteria derived lysates, a significant stimulation from 2 D gel separated lysates was not detected. In addition γδ T cells failed to respond towards leishmania or leishmanial components. In the αβ T cell compartment some donors, presumably according to their state of immunity against mycobacteria, responded to mycobacteria, mycobacterial lysates and 2 D gel separated mycobacterial lysates. Neither freshly isolated γδ T cells nor αβ T cells from naive donors did mount a significant immune response against leishmania.

Keywords

Primary Immune Response Gamma Delta Significant Immune Response Leishmanial Antigen Mycobacterial Component 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Pfeffer
    • 1
  • B. Schoel
    • 3
  • H. Gulle
    • 3
  • Heidrun Moll
    • 2
  • Sandra Kromer
    • 1
  • S. H. E. Kaufmann
    • 1
  • H. Wagner
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Medical Microbiology and HygieneTechnical University of MunichGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Clinical MicrobiologyUniversity of ErlangenGermany
  3. 3.Institute of Medical MicrobiologyUniversity of UlmGermany

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