Advertisement

Modulation of Murine Self Antigens by Mycobacterial Components

  • R. Mann
  • E. Dudley
  • Y. Sano
  • Rebeeca O’Brien
  • W. Born
  • Ch. JanewayJr.
  • A. Hayday
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 173)

Abstract

Responses of γδ T cells to antigen are poorly understood. Murine double negative γ(+) cells generally increase in number late in mixed lymphocyte reactions (Jones et al., 1988). In humans and mice, there are instances of allo-reactive γδ T cells directed at polymorphic products of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (Bluestone et al., 1988; Ciccone, et al., 1989). In addition, other γδ cells recognise, or are restricted by Class I-MHC-like molecules, TL, CD1, and Qa (Bonneville et al., 1989, Porcelli et al., 1989; Vidovic et al. 1989). These observations encourage the hypothesis that γδ cells recognise presenting molecules similar to, if not the same as, those recognised by αβ T cells. However, it is unclear whether in vivo, populations of γδ cells exploit high junctional diversity to recognise myriad peptides on such presenting molecules. Alternatively, populations of γδ cells with T cell receptors (TCRs) encoded by the same Vγ and Vδ genes may be selected primarily to recognise self (presenting) molecules. Such self molecules could be induced by stress, such as cell transformation or infection (Janeway et al, 1988).

Keywords

Major Histocompatibility Complex Mixed Lymphocyte Reaction Daudi Cell CTLL Cell Polymorphic Product 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bluestone, J., Cron, R.Q., Cotterman, M., Houlden, B., Matis, L. (1988) Structure and specificity of T cell receptor γδ on MHC-specific CD3+,CD4-, CD8-T lymphocytes. J.Exp. Med 168:189–1916.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bonneville, M., Ito, K., Krecko, E., Itohara, S., Kappes, D., Ishida, I., Kanegawa, O., Janeway, C., Murphy, D., Tonegawa, S. (1989) Recognition of a self MHC TL region product by γδ T cell receptors. Proc.Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86:5928–5932.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Born, W., Hall, L., Dallas, A., Boymel, J., Shinnick, T., Young, D., Brennan, P., and O’Brien R. (1990) Recognition of a peptide antigen by heat shock reactive γδ lymphocytes Science 249:67–69.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Cicconi, E., Vialo, O., Pende, D., Malnati, M., Battista Ferrara, G., Barocci, S., Moretta, A., Moretta, L. (1988) Antigen recognition by human TCR γ(+) lymphocytes. Specific lysis of allogeneic cells after activation in MLC. J. Exp. Med 167:1517–1522.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Ellis, J. (1987) Proteins as molecular chaperones Nature 328:378–379.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Fisch, P., Malkovsky, M., Kovats, S., Sturm, E., Braakman, E., Klein, B., Voss, S., Morrisey, L., DeMars, R., Welch, W., Bolhuis, R., Sondel, P. (1990) Recognition by human vγ9,Vδ2 T cells of a groEL homolog on Daudi cells Science-in the press.Google Scholar
  7. Happ, M.P., Kubo, R.T., Palmer, E., Born, W., O’Brien, R. (1989) Limited receptor repertoire in a mycobacteria-reactive subset of γδ T lymphocytes Nature 342:696–699.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Janeway, C., Jones, B., Hayday, A. (1988) Specificity and function of T cells bearing γδ receptors Immunol Today 9:73–76.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Jones, B., Carding, S., Kyes, S., Mjolsness, S., Janeway, C., Hayday, A. Molecular analysis of T cell receptor γ gene expression in allo-activated splenic T cells of adult mice. Eur. J. Immunol. 18: 1907-1915.Google Scholar
  10. O’Brien, R., Happ, M.P., Dallas, A., Palmer, E., Kubo, R., Born, W. (1989) Stimulation of a major subset of lymphocytes expressing T cell receptor γδ by an antigen derived from mycobacterium tuberculosis. Cell 57:667–674.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Pfeffer, K., Schoel, B., Gulle, H., Kaufman, S., Wagner, H. (1990) Primary responses of human T cells to mycobacteria: a frequent set of γδ T cells are stimulated by protease resistant ligands. Eur. J. Immunol. 20:1175–1179.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Porcelli, S., Brenner, M., Greenstein, J., Balk, S., Terhorst, C., Bleicher, P. (1989) Recognition of CD1 by human CD4-, CD8-cytolytic T cells. Nature 341:447–449.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Sturm, E., Braakman, E., Fisch, P., Vreugdenhil, R., Sondel, P., Bolhuis, R. (1990) Human Vγ9-Vδ2 lymphocytes show specificity to Daudi cells. J. Immuol. — in the press.Google Scholar
  14. Tada, N., Kimura, S., Hatzfeld, A., Hammerling, U. (1980) Ly-mll: The H3 region of mouse chromosome 2 controls a new surface alloantigen. Immunogenetics 11:441–449.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Townsend, A., Ohlen, C., Bastin, J., Ljunggren, H-G., Foster, L., Karre, K. (1989) Association of class I MHC heavy and light chains induced by viral peptides Nature 340:443–448.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Vidovic, D., Rogli, C., McKune, K., Guerder, S., MacKay, C., and Dembic, Z. (1989) Qa-1 restricted recognition of foreign antigen by a γδ T cell hybridoma Nature 340:646–650.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Mann
    • 1
  • E. Dudley
    • 1
  • Y. Sano
    • 3
  • Rebeeca O’Brien
    • 2
  • W. Born
    • 2
  • Ch. JanewayJr.
    • 3
  • A. Hayday
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of BiologyYale UniversityNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.National Jewish CenterDenverUSA
  3. 3.Dept. of ImmunologyYale UniversityUSA

Personalised recommendations