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The Release of Aluminium into Soil Solutions and Drainage Waters

  • B. W. Bache

Abstract

One of the main effects of the acidification of the environment is the enhanced solubility of aluminium, an important toxin for biological systems. Data for Al solubility in soil solution and surface waters are discussed in terms of the processes that may be occurring. While for many systems experimental Al concentrations are consistent with the operation of solubility or cation-exchange controls, the high variability of soluble Al concentrations found in streams can only be explained by a delicate interplay between chemical and hydrological processes that are specific to the site in question.

Keywords

Soil Solution Acid Deposition Storm Flow Aqueous Aluminium Base Flow Stream 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. W. Bache
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeographyCambridgeUK

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