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Oceanic Sources of Sulphur and their Contribution to the Atmospheric Sulphur Budget: A Review

  • C. Nicholas Hewitt
  • Brian Davidson

Abstract

This paper reviews current knowledge concerning the biogenic emissions of sulphur from the oceans and their contribution to the atmospheric sulphur budget. In particular, the temporal and spatial distributions of such emissions are considered, as are the magnitude of their fluxes. The importance of the reduced sulphur species to the deposition of acidity from the atmosphere, relative to anthropogenic sources, is also discussed.

Keywords

Diurnal Cycle Marine Boundary Layer Marine Atmosphere Methane Sulphonic Acid Dimethyl Sulphide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Nicholas Hewitt
    • 1
  • Brian Davidson
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Environmental and Biological SciencesLancaster UniversityLancasterUK

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