Artificial Seeds — Encapsulated Somatic Embryos

  • K. Redenbaugh
  • J. Fujii
  • D. Slade
  • P. Viss
  • M. Kossler
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 17)

Abstract

Somatic embryogenesis has been observed for a wide array of species (Ammirato 1983). Despite advances made in the past 30 years with somatic embryogeny, there has been no commercial development. Although oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) can be propagated by somatic embryogenesis, the method being commercialized uses in vitro–rooted shoots, a high–cost propagation system (Corley 1982). Unfortunately, for most crops in which the per–unit seed value is low, labor–intensive micropropagation systems are not feasible. Somatic embryogenesis appears to be the only clonal propagation system suitable for crops currently propagated by seeds.

Keywords

Carbide Respiration Dehydration Fructose Vinyl 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Redenbaugh
    • 1
  • J. Fujii
    • 2
  • D. Slade
    • 3
  • P. Viss
    • 4
  • M. Kossler
    • 1
  1. 1.Calgene IncDavisUSA
  2. 2.The University of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  3. 3.University of SeattleUSA
  4. 4.Plant Research LaboratoryModestoUSA

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