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Neurochemical Changes in Brains from Patients with Vascular Dementia

  • C. G. Gottfries
  • I. Alafuzoff
  • A. Carlsson
  • S.-Å. Eckernäs
  • I. Karlsson
  • L. Oreland
  • L. Svennerholm
  • A. Wallin

Abstract

Vascular dementia (VD) is usually assumed to be caused by infarctions of the brain. The etiology of multi-infarct dementia (MID) is discussed in Cummings and Benson [6]. However, as far back as 1894, Alzheimer presented Die arteriosklerotische Atrophie des Gehirns [3]. In this presentation, the concept of Binswanger’s disease and multi-infarctions was discussed, as was perivascular gliosis. Thus, in this early presentation of VD, not only infarcts, but also other substrates such as white matter and small vessel changes were regarded as pathogenetic factors.

Keywords

Caudate Nucleus Vascular Dementia Senile Plaque Neurochemical Change Parahippocampal Cortex 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. G. Gottfries
    • 1
  • I. Alafuzoff
    • 1
  • A. Carlsson
    • 1
  • S.-Å. Eckernäs
    • 1
  • I. Karlsson
    • 1
  • L. Oreland
    • 1
  • L. Svennerholm
    • 1
  • A. Wallin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, St Jörgen’s HospitalUniversity of GöteborgHisings BackaSweden

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