Protective Activity of MDP-Lys (L-18) and Recombinant Cytokines Against Sendai Virus and Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Infections in Mice

  • I. Azuma
  • C. Ishihara
  • J. Iida
  • Y. Yamamura
Conference paper

Abstract

Previously, we have established the experimental model using Sendai virus in mice for the screening of immunostimulants which were effective for the enhancement of nonspecific host resistance against viral infection (Ishihara 1985). By using this experimental model, we have reported that synthetic derivatives of N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanylD-isoglutamine (MDP), especially Nα-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutaminyl-Nε-stearoyl-L-lysine [MDP-Lys(L18)], chitin derivatives, polypeptides and dihydroheptaprenyl were potent immunostimulants for the potentiation of host resistance against bacterial and viral infections in experimental models (Iida 1987, 1989a, 1990; Ishihara 1985, 1987, 1989). More recently the efficacy of MDP-Lys(L18) was proved by clinical trials for the increase of the number of leukocytes and platelets of cancer patients who received chemotherapy and other conventional therapy (Tsubura 1988).

Keywords

Albumin Influenza Polypeptide Resis Cyclophosphamide 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Azuma
    • 1
  • C. Ishihara
    • 1
  • J. Iida
    • 1
  • Y. Yamamura
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Immunological ScienceHokkaido UniversityKita-ku, Sapporo 060Japan
  2. 2.Osaka UniversitySuita, Osaka 565Japan

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