Orally Administered Lectin Stimulates Defence Mechanisms in Humans

  • P. Luther
  • H. Reutgen
  • I. Sehrt
  • H. Renner
  • K. Noack
  • K.-H. Schubert
  • D. Werchan

Summary

Enteric coated lectin from Triticum vulgare (WGA) was used for oral administration in men. This encapsulated WGA stimulates human T-lymphocytes in vivo, increases the γ-interferon level (IFN) in serum and leads also to a strong enhancement of the ingestion rate in granulocytes without significant changes in the lysosomal enzyme production. The oral administration of enteric coated WGA represents a new way for immunostimulation in humans and could be a chance to increase the effectiveness of viral and bacterial vaccines.

Keywords

Sugar Influenza Sedimentation Interferon Dextran 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Luther
    • 1
  • H. Reutgen
    • 1
  • I. Sehrt
    • 1
  • H. Renner
    • 1
  • K. Noack
    • 1
  • K.-H. Schubert
    • 1
  • D. Werchan
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Institute for Lung DiseasesBerlin-BuchGermany

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