Atmospheric Distribution of Some Trace Metals in Malatya

  • Şeref Güçer
  • Mustafa Demir
  • A. Ersin Karagözler
  • Mustafa Karakaplan
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 31)

Abstract

Air pollution is one of the greatest risks to human health and the environment world wide. As a term “Air Pollution”, readily reminds health problems associated with atmospheric sulfur dioxide, ozone, carbon monoxide and NOX gases, acid rain and airborne particulate material. Lead also is added to this list as it is still widely used in gasoline as an anti-knock agent and its adverse effects on human health and vegetation are well known and of continuing concern. However, several metals other than lead can also be found in ambient air and the types and concentrations of these metals are determined by the nature and position of their emission sources, as well as climatic conditions and transport characteristics of the respective metals. Notably among these are mercury and beryllium, which are considered to contribute to an increase in mortality and serious illness and thus, their presence in ambient air is monitored by the EPA (USEPA).

Keywords

Zinc Burning Toxicity Dioxide Dust 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Şeref Güçer
    • 1
  • Mustafa Demir
    • 1
  • A. Ersin Karagözler
    • 1
  • Mustafa Karakaplan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryInönü UniversityMalatyaTurkey

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