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Some Factors Affecting N-Nitroso Compound Formation from Ingested Nitrate in the Stomach: Achlorhydria, Bacterial N-Nitrosation and its Modulation

  • S. Leach
  • C. Mackerness
  • K. McPherson
  • P. Packer
  • M. Hill
  • M. Thompson
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 30)

Abstract

Bacterial N-nitrosation and nitrate reduction in the mouth and achlorhydric stomach may play an important role in determining the carcinogenic risk of nitrate exposure through N-nitroso compound (NNC) formation. The factors known to modulate the extent of these two processes are numerous, and through their differential action between individuals may promote profound differences in levels of NNC formation from particular levels of nitrate exposure. It may be difficult at present to allow for this in epidemiological studies.

Keywords

Nitrate Reductase Activity Carcinogenic Risk Human Gastric Juice Nitrate Reductase Enzyme Dietary Nitrate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Leach
    • 1
  • C. Mackerness
    • 1
  • K. McPherson
    • 1
  • P. Packer
    • 1
  • M. Hill
    • 1
  • M. Thompson
    • 1
  1. 1.Pathology DivisionPHLS-Centre for Applied Microbiology and ResearchSalisbury, WiltshireUK

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