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Limb Salvage pp 175-183 | Cite as

Reconstruction of Bone Defects

  • S. Ghera
  • M. Manili
  • M. Astolfi
  • M. Stopponi
  • F. S. Santori
Conference paper

Abstract

Today, thanks to more precise histological classifications and more detailed surgical staging, conservative operations of bone tumors are ever more frequent. Consequently, there is a growing need to reconstruct longer and larger portions of skeletal segments. Resected bone tissue can be restored by various techniques:
  1. 1.

    Through the use of prostheses which, however, are contraindicated for benign tumors or in young patients

     
  2. 2.

    Through the use of donor transplants which, however, can create problems of histocompatibility, delays in consolidation, infection, and serious fractures

     
  3. 3.

    Through the use of autografts (the most frequently used method), which, however, produce a weakening in the limb at the donor site, increase the risk of infection at the reconstruction site, lengthen surgical times, and, by their very nature limit bone stock availability.

     

Keywords

Bone Tissue Bone Defect Giant Cell Tumor Tricalcium Phosphate Villonodular Synovitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Lange T A, Zerwekh JE, Peek RD, Mooney V, Harrison BH (1987) Granular tricalcium phosphate in large cancellous defects. Ann Clin Lab Sci 16(6): 467–472Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Ghera
    • 1
  • M. Manili
    • 2
  • M. Astolfi
    • 2
  • M. Stopponi
    • 2
  • F. S. Santori
    • 2
  1. 1.Forlanini HospitalRomeItaly
  2. 2.Orthopaedic ClinicUniversity of RomeRomeItaly

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