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Internalization and Sorting of Macromolecules: Endocytosis

  • T. E. McGraw
  • F. R. Maxfield
Part of the Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology book series (HEP, volume 100)

Abstract

Endocytosis is a process used by cells to internalize a variety of macromolecules, supramolecular complexes, and organisms. This large variety of molecules that enter cells by endocytosis illustrates the general physiological importance of this pathway. An understanding of endocytosis will provide insight into the methods available for a cell to sense and respond to its environment as well as a potential means for targeted drug delivery.

Keywords

Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Late Endosome Semliki Forest Virus Endocytic Vesicle Recycling Endosome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. E. McGraw
  • F. R. Maxfield

There are no affiliations available

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