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Beyond Non-Proliferation

  • Bhalchandra Udgaonkar
Conference paper

Abstract

The first atomic weapons were exploded over Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945, six weeks after the signing of the United Nations Charter. In its very first resolution, arising from the initiative of the five permanent members of the Security Council and Canada, adopted in January 1946, the General Assembly of the United Nations unanimously decided to establish an Atomic Energy Commission which was to make specific proposals for the elimination of atomic weapons from national armaments. The Commission could not make any headway because of the irreconcilable differences between the superpowers. What survived its deliberations and related discussions at the United Nations and elsewhere, at the hands of the big powers (which one by one developed their own nuclear weapon capabilities in the meantime) was the idea of non-proliferation, decoupled from the disarmament dimension, in due course leading to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) of 1968 [1]. While much is made of the fact that the NPT has 140 parties as of May 1989, one should note that the non-signatories include not only two nuclear-weapon powers, namely China and France, but also several threshold powers, and that 45 per cent of the world’s population is in states which have not accepted the NPT. Even among some of the signatory states there have been serious discussions of going nuclear after 1995, if the present nuclear-weapon states are allowed to retain a minimum deterrence.

Keywords

Nuclear Weapon Nuclear Disarmament Nuclear Capability United Nation Charter Nuclear Arsenal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bhalchandra Udgaonkar

There are no affiliations available

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