Experimental Study of the Origin of Transcranially Evoked Descending Spinal Cord Potentials

  • T. Yamamoto
  • Y. Katayama
  • T. Tsubokawa
  • S. Maejima
  • T. Hirayama
  • J. Xing
Conference paper

Abstract

It has been demonstrated that a corticospinal response to direct stimulation of the motor cortex can be recorded from the lateral column of the spinal cord or the spinal epidural space [4, 5, 9, 10]. It has also been reported that identical responses can be recorded in cats and humans using transcranial brain stimulation [6, 7]. A reliable technique of transcranial brain stimulation would be of great value for monitoring pyramidal tract function, since this method does not require any operation to be performed in order to stimulate the motor cortex directly. However, there is some doubt as to whether spinal cord responses to transcranial brain stimulation really represent impulses mediated by pyramidal neurons. We previously compared the corticospinal D response to stimulation of exposed motor cortex and the spinal cord responses to transcranial brain stimulation in cats [4], and we found that spinal cord responses to transcranial brain stimulation are easily confused with responses other than the corticospinal D response.

Keywords

Neurol Ketamine Dura Pentobarbital 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Yamamoto
    • 1
  • Y. Katayama
  • T. Tsubokawa
  • S. Maejima
  • T. Hirayama
  • J. Xing
  1. 1.Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineItabashi-ku, Tokyo, 173Japan

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