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A New Mediterranean Species of Axinella Detected by Biochemical Genetic Methods

  • A. M. Solé-Cava
  • J. P. Thorpe
  • R. Manconi

Abstract

There has been a recent revival of interest in the use of marine sponges as models in molecular biology (Akiyama and Johnson 1983; Garrone 1984; Muller et al. 1985; Dams 1986), immunology (Smith and Hildemann 1984; Buscema and van de Vyver 1985; Kaye and Reiswig 1985; Smith and Hildemann 1986), evolutionary genetics (Balakirev and Manchenko 1985; Solé-Cava and Thorpe 1986, 1987, 1990), and chemical ecology (Amade et al. 1987; Braekman and Daloze 1986; Dyrynda 1985). This interest can be related to the particular position sponges occupy in zoological classification. Work on the evolution of any given cellular or biochemical process often needs to take into account “how far down” the zoological scale that process is found (Scudder 1987), and the Porifera, as an ancient group, provide an invaluable subject for such studies.

Keywords

Reproductive Isolation Marine Sponge Sponge Species Protein Polymorphism Calcareous Sponge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. M. Solé-Cava
  • J. P. Thorpe
  • R. Manconi

There are no affiliations available

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