Morphological and Pathogenetic Considerations in Entrapment Syndromes

  • L. Gerhard
  • V. Reinhardt
  • E. Koob
  • H.-E. Nau
Conference paper

Abstract

The damage to peripheral nerves by entrapment is due to compressive mechanisms that occur where the nerves are normally confined to narrow anatomic passage pathways and are therefore susceptible to compression. This definition does not include any details about the pathogenetic mechanisms in entrapment syndromes. It is also known that the peripheral nerves are more susceptible to mechanical injury in special metabolic conditions such as alcoholism, diabetes mellitus, malnutrition syndromes, and endocrine disturbances. The best known entrapment neuropathy is the carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) of the median nerve. Other syndromes of the ulnar and radial nerves as well as of the peroneal nerve are less frequent and therefore less well investigated. Only little attention has been paid to the “painful hand” (interosseous ramus of radial nerve syndrome, IRS).

Keywords

Formalin Neuropathy Neurol Paraffin Sudan 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Gerhard
    • 1
  • V. Reinhardt
    • 1
  • E. Koob
    • 1
  • H.-E. Nau
    • 1
  1. 1.EssenGermany

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