Sensory Robotics: Identifying Sewing Problems

  • S. C. Harlock
  • D. W. Lloyd
  • G. Stylios
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 64)

Abstract

An essential feature of any automated garment manufacturing system is that it produces high quality seams, i.e. seams free from pucker, free from damage, with properly balanced sewing threads, etc. If poor quality seams are produced, all the sophistication of automated production will be wasted, as the garments produced will be commercially unacceptable. The various types of seam faults may be identified in different ways; this has consequences for the way in which sensing is carried out. Some “sensing”, because it relates to fabric or thread properties, is most appropriately carried out as part of quality control on incoming materials and not at the point of production. Other problems, because they arise as part of the sewing operation, are best identified at the sewing station.

Keywords

Compressibility 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. C. Harlock
    • 1
  • D. W. Lloyd
    • 1
  • G. Stylios
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Textile IndustriesUniversity of LeedsLeedsEngland
  2. 2.School of Industrial TechnologyUniversity of BradfordBradfordUK

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