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rIL-2 Immunotherapy for 19 Children with Advanced Metastatic Neuroblastoma

  • M. C. Favrot
  • J. Michon
  • E. Bouffet
  • S. Négrier
  • P. Cochat
  • D. Floret
  • M. Gaspard
  • C. Coze
  • G. Andreu
  • C. R. Franks
  • I. Philip
  • T. Philip
Conference paper

Abstract

Considerable progress has been achieved in the treatment of stage IV neuroblastoma in children over 1 year of age. Induction therapy and surgery followed by vincristine, high-dose melphalan, total body irridiation, and autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) enable the achievement of 40% progression-free survival at 2 years post-transplantation [1]. However, late relapses occurring up to 72 months post-graft, with a projected disease- free survival at 5 years of only 20% to 25%, are a major concern. Therefore, new therapeutic approaches are needed; spontaneous regression of this tumor in children below 1 year of age favors a role of the immune system in antitumoral defense and the potential benefit of immunotherapy. However, since neuroblastoma cells lack class I and II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens, any attempt to stimulate antitumoral defense should involve non-MHC-restricted immunity.

This work was supported by grant n°6245 from the Association pour la Recherche sur le Cancer, réseau INSERM LMCE n°48–60-22, and Comite de la Savoie of the Ligue Nationale contre le Cancer (grant RS-01()88).

Keywords

Natural Killer Natural Killer Cell Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation Lymphokine Activate Killer Lymphokine Activate Killer Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
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    Favrot M, Floret D, Michon J et al. (1989) A phase II study of adoptive immunotherapy with continuous infusion of Interleukin 2 in children with advanced neuroblastoma. Cancer Treat Rev 16, suppl A:129–142Google Scholar
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    Favrot MC, Floret D, Negrier S et al. (1989) First report of systemic IL2 therapy in children with progressive neuroblastoma after high dose chemotherapy and bone marrow transplanta¬tion. Bone Marrow Transplantation 4:499–503PubMedGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. C. Favrot
  • J. Michon
  • E. Bouffet
  • S. Négrier
  • P. Cochat
  • D. Floret
  • M. Gaspard
  • C. Coze
  • G. Andreu
  • C. R. Franks
  • I. Philip
  • T. Philip

There are no affiliations available

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