Functional Organization of the Common Brainstem System to Different States at Different Times

  • F. Ebinger
  • M. Lambertz
  • P. Langhorst

Abstract

The investigation of the way in which the central nervous system is organized has been dominated by two concepts. The holistic concept considers the brain as a single dynamic whole. The localization concept relegates functions to different isolated parts of the brain (see [6, 20]). For technical reasons most experiments, until the middle of our century, were done from a morphological aspect and supported the localization concept. This experimental approach dominated the manner of thinking and even led to the use of morphological terms for functional systems, e.g. reticular system or limbic system.

Keywords

Manifold Covariance Respiration Coupl Ings Vigile 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Ebinger
  • M. Lambertz
  • P. Langhorst

There are no affiliations available

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