Local Immune Responses to Helicobacter pylori Infections

  • A. R. Stacey
  • P. R. Hawtin
  • D. G. Newell

Abstract

It is widely accepted that the majority of people with H. pylori infections amount a large circulating antibody response against that organism [1]. This response has proved to be so predictable that it forms the basis of serodiagnostic tests such as ELISA [2, 3]. The sensitivity and specificity of such tests depends largely on the antigen preparations used, although ELISAs using a variety of crude and more purified antigens are reported to be greater than 90 % sensitive and specific for detecting H. pylori infection [4, 5].

Keywords

Gastritis Dyspepsia Duodenitis 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. R. Stacey
    • 1
  • P. R. Hawtin
    • 1
  • D. G. Newell
    • 1
  1. 1.Immunodiagnostics GroupPHLS-CAMRSalisbury, WiltsUK

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