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Helicobacter pylori: Microbiological Aspects

A Plea for a More Critical Approach to Laboratory Investigation of this Gastroduodenal Pathogen

Abstract

The spiral shaped bacterium first isolated in Perth, Western Australia by Barry Marshall in 1983 [13, 25] was called Campylobacter pyloridis because on light microscopy it appeared similar to other campylobacters, e.g. C.jejuni, and similar media and gaseous environments were required to grow it. Just as workers in the field were accepting this name it was changed to Campylobacter pylori so as to be more grammatically correct [14]. Now, yet again we are asked to use a different name, Helicobacter pylori [8] as is explained elsewhere in this publication. The reasons for these changes are well founded. From the first laboratory investigation of this gastric bacterium, it was clear that the organism did not sit easily in the genus Campylobacter. Indeed, attempts to draw analogies with Campylobacter jejuni resulted in some unrealistic investigations such as screening flocks of chickens as a likely reservoir. Gastroenterologists should rest assured that it is very unlikely we, the microbiologists, will continue to inflict new nomenclature on them in the future. H. pylori now sits rightly as a distinct genus and provided this name comes into common usage it will remain. However, the more we learn about gastric bacteria the greater the chances that other species within the genus will be discovered.

Keywords

Parietal Cell Gastric Mucus Gastroduodenal Disease Control Organism Active Chronic Gastritis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Lee
    • 1
  1. 1.School of MicrobiologyUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia

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