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The Scientific Basis for Controlling Exposures to Phyllosilicate Dust at the Workplace

  • P. Sébastien
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 21)

Abstract

This paper will only consider the risk of non malignant pulmonary disease (“Silicatosis”) associated with the inhalation of phyllosilicate dust at the workplace. Other sources of exposure were dealt with by Drs BOUTIN and VIALLAT at this conference and evaluation for carcinogenicity is the role of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Among the non fibrous phyllosilicates, only talc has been evaluated for carcinogenicity (World Health Organization 1978). According to IARC, there is inadequate evidence for the carcinogenicity to humans of talc not containing asbestiform fibres, while there is sufficient evidence for the carcinogenicity to humans of talc containing asbestiform fibres.

Keywords

Coal Mine Mining Industry Coal Dust Dust Exposure Respirable Dust 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Sébastien
    • 1
  1. 1.Groupe “Santé au Travail, Hygiene et Toxicologie Industrielles”CERCHARVerneuil en HalatteFrance

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