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Knowledge Structures and Knowledge Representation: Psychological Models of Conceptual Order

  • Thomas Eckes
Conference paper

Abstract

The present paper is concerned with a critical examination of recent theoretical approaches to concepts. Specifically, it addresses the question of how to model natural concepts whose exemplars vary along a continuum of concept membership. In the first section, relevant positions in the theory of concepts and categorization are discussed. Subsequently a representational model accounting for people’s comprehension of simple and complex concepts is outlined.

Keywords

Gradient Theory Natural Concept Prototype Theory Conceptual Combination Representational Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Eckes
    • 1
  1. 1.Fachrichtung PsychologieUniversität des SaarlandesGermany

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