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The Scid Mouse pp 259-263 | Cite as

Growth of Human Tumors in Immune-Deficient scid Mice and nude Mice

  • R. A. Phillips
  • M. A. S. Jewett
  • B. L. Gallie
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 152)

Abstract

The ability to grow human tumors in immune-deficient mice offers offers many research opportunities (Sharkey and Fogh 1984). In addition to simply providing a source of cells for investigation, such animals can provide models for testing therapeutic protocols (Niederkorn 1984; Brunner et al. 1987), for studying metastasis (Dore et al. 1987), and for analyzing changes associated with tumor induction and progression (Sordat and Wang 1984). Although nude mice have been used for many years to grow various human tumors, we expected that scid mice might be better recipients for growth of human tumors because the immune deficiency in scid mice is more severe than that in nude mice (Bosma et al. 1983). To test this hypothesis, we have compared the ability of various different human tumors to grow subcutaneously in nude mice and scid mice.

Keywords

Nude Mouse Human Tumor Scid Mouse Severe Combine Immunodeficiency Human Lung Tumor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. Phillips
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. A. S. Jewett
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • B. L. Gallie
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Hematology/OncologyThe Hospital for Sick ChildrenTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Department of Medical GeneticsUniversity of TorontoCanada
  3. 3.Division of UrologyThe Wellesley HospitalTorontoCanada
  4. 4.Department of SurgeryUniversity of TorontoCanada

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