Kinetics of Dye/β-Cyclodextrin Interactions

  • V. C. Reinsborough
  • Y. E. MacPherson
  • R. Palepu
  • Josef F. Holzwarth
Conference paper

Abstract

The rate of association of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) with each of three similar azo dyes, methyl orange (MO), methyl red (MR) and pyridine-2-p-dimethylaniline (PADA) was determined by the continuous flow method of integrating observation (CFMIO) at pH 8.4. For all three systems, the rate constants were similar and decreased with increasing dye concentration from 107dm3mol-1 S-1 in l mmol dm-3 of β-CD solution to k = 104 dm3mol-1 S-1 in 7 mmol dm-3 β-CD solution. Discrepancies with joule-heating temperature jump results in the literature disappeared when the rate constants were re-determined in 0.5 mol dm-3 NaCl. The chloride ion was identified as the weakly binding species to β-CD that affected the temperature-jump results. Binding constants were obtained conductometrically for the β-CD/M0 and β-C /MR complex species and for β-CD/PADA by a competitive stopped-flow method. The principal inclusion complex with MO is 1:1 but with MR a considerable quantity of the 2:1 β-CD/MR complex is also formed.

Keywords

Carbohydrate Oligomer Dimethyl Aniline Kelly 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Saeger W (1980) 19:344Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Crowe11 WC, Byström K, Eftink MR (1985) J Phys Chem 89:326CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Kondo H, Nakatani H, Hiromo K (1976) J Biochem 79:393Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Jiang X-K, Gu J-H, Cheng X-E, Hui Y-Z (1987) Acta Chim Sinica 45:159Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Palepu R, Reinsborough VC (1988) Can J Chem 66:325CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Szejtli J (1984) In: Atwood JL, Davies JED, MacNicof DD (eds) Inclusion Compounds. Academic- LondonGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Tabushi I IbidGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Breslow R IbidGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Pagington JS (1987) Chem Britain 23:455Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Saenger W In: Atwood JL, Davies JED, MacNicol DD (eds) Inclusion Compounds. Academic LondonGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Clarke RJ, Coates JH, Lincoln SF (1984) Carbohydrate Res 127:181CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Schiller RL, Coates JH, Lincoln SF (1984) J Chem Soc Far I 80:1257Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Clarke RJ, Coates JH, Lincoln SF (1984) J Chem Soc Far I 80:3119Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Hershey A, Robinson BH (1984) J Chem Soc Far I 80:2039Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Hershey A, Robinson BH, Kelly HC (1986) J Chem Soc Far I 82:1271Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Holzwarth JF (1979) In: Techniques and Applications of Fast Reactions in Solution. Reidel DordrechtGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Eck V, Marcus M, Stange C, Westerhausen J, Holzwarth JF (1981) Ber Bensenges Phys Chem 85:869Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Reinsborough VC, Holzwarth JF (1986) Can J Chem 64:955CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Rohrbach RP, Rodriguez LJ, Eyring EM, Sojcik JF (1977) J Phys Chem 81:944CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    James AD, Robinson BH (1978) J Chem Soc Far I 74:10Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Zollinger DP, Bülten E, Christenhusz A, Bos M, van der Linden WE (1987) Anal Chim Acta 198:207CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Fletcher PDI, Robinson BH (1984) J Chem Soc Far I 80:2417Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Jobe DJ, Verrall RE, Palepu R, Reinsborough VC (1988) J Phys Chem 92:3582CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Miyajima K, Sawada M, Nakagaki M (1983) Bull Chem Soc Jpn 56:355CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. C. Reinsborough
    • 1
  • Y. E. MacPherson
    • 2
  • R. Palepu
    • 2
  • Josef F. Holzwarth
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryMount Allison UniversitySackville, New BrunswickCanada
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryUniversity College of Cape BretonSydney, Nova ScotiaCanada
  3. 3.Fritz-Haber-InstitutMax-Planck-GesellschaftBerlin 33West Germany

Personalised recommendations