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Transferrin Derivatives with Growth Factor Activities in Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia:An Autocrine/Paracrine Pathway

  • K. H. Pflüger
  • A. Grüber
  • M. Welslau
  • H. Köppler
  • K. Havemann
Conference paper
Part of the Haematology and Blood Transfusion / Hämatologie und Bluttransfusion book series (HAEMATOLOGY, volume 33)

Abstract

In contrast to conditions in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), leukemic blast cells display only limited proliferative capacity when cultured in vitro. Apart from well-defined nutrients these cell lines need supplementation with serum providing a great number of specific and unspeciflc growth factors. In general leukemic cells are excellent models for studying malignant cell growth and differentiation arrest. For the investigation of the effects of single growth or differentiation factors adaptation of leukemic cells to minimal essential and clearly defined culture conditions is essential.

Keywords

Conditioned Medium Salmon Calcitonin Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography Growth Factor Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. H. Pflüger
    • 1
  • A. Grüber
    • 1
  • M. Welslau
    • 1
  • H. Köppler
    • 1
  • K. Havemann
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology/ImmunologyPhilipps-University of MarburgGermany

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