Complotyping and Subtyping of MHC Class I Gene Products in Haplotype Determination for Bone Marrow Transplantation

  • I. Doxiadis
  • G. Doxiadis
  • D. W. Beelen
  • G. Frenz
  • U. W. Schaefer
  • U. Vögeler
  • H. Grosse-Wilde
Conference paper
Part of the Haematology and Blood Transfusion / Hämatologie und Bluttransfusion book series (HAEMATOLOGY, volume 33)

Abstract

In order to prevent major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-induced graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), the best possible match between donor and recipient is achieved between monozygotic twins [1]. It is well known that this is only possible in very few patients. In cases where parents share an HLA haplotype, or are phenotypically homozygous, or even appear to be identical, problems in the inheritance of HLA haplotypes among the offspring do occur. These uncertainties cannot be solved by the serological HLA typing or cellular typing of HLA-D-encoded gene products. For that reason we introduced two following additional biochemical typing methods:
  1. 1.

    Complotyping, i.e., definition of the MHC-encoded polymorphic complement components Bf, C2, C4A, and C4B. The C4A and C4B allotypes are as polymorphic as the HLA-A and HLA-B antigens, with 12 C4A and 18 C4B variants. In addition, a duplication of one of the C4 genes is observed in 1% of the cases [2].

     
  2. 2.

    Subtyping of class I gene products by one-dimensional isoelectric focusing (1D-IEF). As we showed recently, the application of 1D-IEF followed by an immunoblotting raises the number of serologically defined antigens by nearly 60% [3, 4].

     

Keywords

Leukemia Recombination Electrophoresis Dition Diamine 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Ringden O, Nilsson B (1985) Death by graft versus host disease is associated with HLA mismatch, high recipient age, and splenectomy. Transplantation 40: 39–44PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Uring-Lambert B, Giles CM, Goetz J, Tongio MM, Mayer S, Hauptmann G (1984) C4 haplotypes with duplicated C4A or C4B: frequency and associations with Bf, C2 and HLA-A, B, C, DR alleles with special reference to the duplication C4B1, 2. In: Albert ED, Baur MP, Mayr WR (eds) Histocompatibility testing 1984. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York Tokyo, pp 604–609Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Neefjes JJ, Doxiadis I, Stam NJ, Beckers CJ, Ploegh HL (1986) An analysis of class I antigens in man and other species by one dimensional IEF and immunoblotting. Immunogenetics 23: 164–171PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Frenz G, Doxiadis I, Vögeler U, Grosse-Wilde H (1989) Segregation analysis of HLA class I subtypes by one dimensional isoelectric focusing, and a comparison with serology. Vox Sang 56: 190–195PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Koelble K, Rukavina V, Kalden RJ (1987) High resolution electrophoresis for the allotyping of human C4: proposal of a rational nomenclature. J Immunol Methods 96: 69–76CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Doxiadis G, Doxiadis I, Frenz G, Vögeler U, Grosse-Wilde H (1989) Relevance of complotyping and subtyping of MHC class I gene products in haplotype definition for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Bone Marrow Transplant 4: 17–22PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Martin W, Ziegler C (1981) Bf-Immunfixation auf Cellogel-Folien. Blut 42: 23–26PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Doxiadis G, Doxiadis I, Grosse-Wilde H (1985) Polymorphism of human C2 detected by immunoblotting. Hum Genet 70: 355–358PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Doxiadis
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. Doxiadis
    • 1
  • D. W. Beelen
    • 3
  • G. Frenz
    • 1
  • U. W. Schaefer
    • 3
  • U. Vögeler
    • 1
  • H. Grosse-Wilde
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of ImmunogeneticsUniversity Hospital EssenGermany
  2. 2.Biotest AGDreieichGermany
  3. 3.Department of Bone Marrow TransplantationUniversity Hospital EssenGermany

Personalised recommendations