High-dose Chemotherapy with Noncryopreserved Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia in First Complete Remission

  • H. Koeppler
  • K. H. Pflueger
  • M. Wolf
  • R. Weide
  • K. Havemann
Conference paper
Part of the Haematology and Blood Transfusion / Hämatologie und Bluttransfusion book series (HAEMATOLOGY, volume 33)

Abstract

Convential chemotherapy as the TAD (thioguanine, Ara-C, daunorubicin) regime is able to induce a high number of complete remissions in the range of 60%–70% in patients with AML. Long-term survival, however, is poor due to a high relapse rate [1, 2]. Strategies to stabilize remission include maintenance therapy, intensification therapy or ablative forms of therapy with allogeneic or autologous bone marrow transplantation. While maintenance therapy gives a statistically significant but only small advantage in disease-free survival, the role of intensification with convential chemotherapy as double induction or late intensification has not been clearly established. Initial results show an increased number of disease-free survivors [3, 4]. Increased long-term survival has been achieved with ablative therapies and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation resulting in 5-year survival rates between 40% and 50% [5, 6].

Keywords

Toxicity Leukemia Oncol Diarrhea Neutropenia 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Koeppler
    • 1
  • K. H. Pflueger
    • 1
  • M. Wolf
    • 1
  • R. Weide
    • 1
  • K. Havemann
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology/OncologyPhilipps-UniversityMarburgGermany

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