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Use of Investigational Drugs as Initial Therapy for Childhood Solid Tumors

  • W. H. Meyer
  • P. J. Houghton
  • M. E. Horowitz
  • E. Etcubanas
  • C. B. Pratt
  • F. A. Hayes
  • E. I. Thompson
  • A. A. Green
  • J. A. Houghton
  • J. T. Sandlund
  • W. M. Crist
Part of the Haematology and Blood Transfusion / Hämatologie und Bluttransfusion book series (HAEMATOLOGY, volume 32)

Abstract

Solid tumors are relatively rare in children, but comprise about two-thirds of all malignancies that affect this age group. Most of these tumors respond well to initial treatment, and some (Wilms’ tumor, low-stage Hodgkin’s disease, low-stage rhabdomyosarcoma, and low-stage neuroblastoma) are readily cured with modern therapy. Still, many tumors that respond initially acquire clinical drug resistance, respond poorly to rechallenge with known active agents, and demonstrate a low level of responsiveness to experimental agents. This creates a major therapeutic dilemma for the pediatric oncologist. Although a critical need exists to identify new active agents for many solid tumors in childhood, current primary therapy is frequently quite active even in tumors which have a very high rate of relapse.

Keywords

Proc ASCO Oral Idarubicin Childhood Solid Tumor Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma Untreated Small Cell Lung Cancer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. H. Meyer
    • 1
    • 3
  • P. J. Houghton
    • 2
  • M. E. Horowitz
    • 1
    • 3
  • E. Etcubanas
    • 1
    • 3
  • C. B. Pratt
    • 1
    • 3
  • F. A. Hayes
    • 1
    • 3
  • E. I. Thompson
    • 1
    • 3
  • A. A. Green
    • 1
    • 3
  • J. A. Houghton
    • 2
  • J. T. Sandlund
    • 1
    • 3
  • W. M. Crist
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Departments of Hematology-OncologySt. Jude Children’s Research HospitalMemphisUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biochemical and Clinical PharmacologySt. Jude Children’s Research HospitalMemphisUSA
  3. 3.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Tennessee, Memphis, College of MedicineMemphisUSA

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