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Regulation of Photosynthesis in Daucus carota and Arachis hypogea Cell Cultures by Exogenous Sucrose

  • K. H. Neuman
  • U. Groß
  • L. Bender

Abstract

It seems to be a general characteristic of mixotrophic and photoautotrophic plant cell cultures to perform CO2 fixation via Rubisco and PEPC simultaneously (Yamada and Sato 1978; Bender et al. 1981; Seeni and Gnanam 1982; Herzbeck and Hüsemann 1985; Nato et al. 1985). As compared to PEPC in C4 plants the Km of the enzyme in cell cultures from C3 plants is considerably lower, (800–1200 μM vs 50–120 μM, O’Leary 1982; Kumar et al. 1988). It has a molecular weight of 440 000 and consists of four identical subunits (Sato et al. 1988). Thus, the molecular weight is in the order of magnitude of the C4 enzyme (Uedan and Sugiyama 1976). Also, in young and actively growing parts of leaves of C3 (Aoyagi and Bassham 1986a) and C4 (Aoyagi and Bassham 1986b) plants a PEPC of similar properties exists and even dominates in carbon fixation. During maturation of leaf tissue the activity and concentration of this enzyme does not change, whereas Rubisco in C3 plants and also C4-PEPC in C4 plants increase during maturation to take the major role in carbon fixation. As reported earlier, a similar influence of developmental processes exists also in photomixotropic carrot tissue cultures (Kumar et al. 1983, 1984) and other cell culture systems (e.g. Nato et al. 1985).

Keywords

Carbon Fixation Triose Phosphate PEPC Activity Mixotrophic Condition Hexose Phosphate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. H. Neuman
  • U. Groß
  • L. Bender
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für PflanzenernährungJustus-Liebig-Universität GießenGießenGermany

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