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Nonlinear Effects in Trapped Three-Level Ions

  • H. Gilhaus
  • T. Sauter
  • R. Blatt
  • W. Neuhauser
  • P. E. Toschek
Conference paper

Abstract

Single trapped and laser-cooled ions have been considered so far paradigms of the ultimate high-resolution spectroscopy and photon statistics. They also represent individual systems with coupled internal and external degrees of freedom simple enough to allow detailed comparison of their kinetics with current models. — We have observed several metastable vibrational states of a single laser-illuminated Ba ion which become excited upon gently heating the ion. They correspond to linear oscillatory modes in r, z directions, which have been documented by image conversion and video recording. — Suitable normalization of the photon-counted and spatially resolved signals of resonance fluorescence allows us to discriminate the features of the electronic excitation spectra and results in spectra of the ion’s vibrational excitation. These spectra reveal two novel types of light force which we ascribe to stimulated two-photon transitions followed by Raman scattering, and to all-stimulated parametric action. — These observations bear upon the interpretation of recent observations on the kinetics of atoms confined in optical molasses.

Keywords

Raman Resonance External Degree Optical Cool Standing Light Wave Light Force 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin, Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Gilhaus
    • 1
  • T. Sauter
    • 1
  • R. Blatt
    • 1
  • W. Neuhauser
    • 1
  • P. E. Toschek
    • 1
  1. 1.Universität HamburgHamburg 36Fed. Rep. of Germany

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